BEYOND THE PEN IS ON TRAVERSE AND IS AVAILABLE ON ROKU, AMAZON FIRE, AND GOOGLE PLAY
July 26, 2022

The Ferryman's Tale

The Ferryman's Tale

We take a trip through Heaven, Hell and Limbo with Death as our guide as he hunts down a psychotically demonic killer named Radix. During our trip down the River Styx, we talk with the ferryman himself, author Chris LaParco, about his book A Story Told. We'll discuss everything from criticism from mainstream publishers and tv directors, the reality of conflicts (real and fictious), and so much for. So get ready for a trip through the afterlife you'll never forget, as we go Beyond the Pen.


In this episode, we discuss everything below and more with author Chris LaParco about his A Story Told book series. Starting with his first book, A Story Told. For timestamps to these topics, see the transcript below.

  1. Mixing Christian Symbolism with a Fantasy genre
  2. Authors are the Characters
  3. Death and the Five Stages of Grief
  4. Dealing with Invisibility
  5. The Realities of Conflict
  6. Dealing with Mainstream Criticism
  7. Trauma IS Hell
  8. Therapeutic Writing
  9. Faust in Modern Day 

 

 

Join our fan webpage on Facebook to get updates about the show, talk to the authors, and so much more. You can also donate to the show at $BeyondthePenPodcast on CashApp to help us create a better product for your listening pleasure.

Thank you.

Transcript
Author Introduction
Maccabee00:40

Exactly. Yeah, there's a, there's a, yeah. Anyways. Today is going to be an interesting day because I actually was introduced to this person through some colleagues of ours by the name of the Huffers, by the way. Hi Huffers or Hey Huffers. I should say...

Marccella00:59

Heffer's?

Maccabee01:01

Huffer's. H-U-F-F-E-R, not heffer's, Huffer's. Don't get me in trouble here. Okay.

Marccella01:08

You know my help with that.

Maccabee01:11

Here we go again. All right. We...

Marccella01:14

We're back

Maccabee01:15

We're back. Yep. We know y'all missed this banter between me and her. Anyways.

Marccella01:20

Absolutely.

Maccabee01:21

This gentleman has written a series of books that is really changing the Christian fiction genre. I mean, Forever. He's got an entirely different viewpoint on this stuff. The first book in his series is called A Story Told, and it takes us on a journey through Heaven, Hell and Limbo with death as our guide. While also making us look at the darker side of humanity, internally and externally. And we'll discuss everything from faith and fantasy to mental health and racism and a whole, lot more. So are you ready? Marcella?

Marccella02:00

I'm always ready.

Maccabee02:02

That's what I'm afraid of. Anyways, without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, the Ferryman himself, Mr. Chris LaParco. Chris, welcome to the show.

Chris LoParco02:13

Hi, thanks for having me. I'm super excited and what the introduction I did not expect that, thank you.

Maccabee02:20

Well, that's usually what happens, you know, but please introduce yourself to our audience and just tell us a little bit about yourself, but most importantly, something we can't find on the internet about you..

Chris LoParco02:34

All right. Well, I'm Chris LaParco. I've authored the Story Told Series. Right now it's three novels and an online series called Man or Machine, which bridges the first, the second book and the third book. What you might not know about me. So my background is actually in illustration and cartooning, which is what got me into writing as well. I originally wanted to do comic books but found myself having more time to pen novels and do spot illustrations and things like that. So I actually do all my own artwork. As well as write the stories. My faith is probably the most important part of my life and following faith is obviously my children you know, and just, I have a very close relationship with God. And when I was starting the series, I wanted to create a fantasy fiction series where God was the center of it because there are so many stories about Greek mythology and Egyptian mythology , Norse mythology and all that stuff; and I said, well, what if I did the same thing, but it was about the true faith or about the true God, you know? And it had Christian you know, for lack of better word mythology or religion as the center of it and, and, you know, angels, demons, Satan you know, and all that kind of mixed in. And so that's kind of what led me to go that route and started the whole series. Hope that was sufficient

Maccabee04:00

Oh, definitely. Definitely. And, and I'm glad you talked about the other mythological characters and tales as well, because I'm gonna get to that a little bit later with you. Cause I got a bone to pick with you on something. No, I'm just kidding.

Marccella04:13

We only have so much time.

Maccabee04:15

That's true. Yeah. We can talk offline about everything else anyways.

So

So much Symbolism

let's, let's talk about the symbolisms expressed through the entire book because let's face it there are a lot. More specifically, the first three chapters. Okay. So between the roles of death and Radix and their story, the three boys and how they died and everything and everyone in chapter three. More specifically. And we're gonna talk about this gentleman too, Stan. What was the purpose of each one of these and how impactful was your faith in the narrative as you wrote it?

Chris LoParco04:55

Wow. So you just, you just unpacked a lot. A lot does happen in the first three chapters of the book and then even beyond. But yeah, so I wanted to have a character outside of the main hero, which you find out later is Nathan or Nathaniel Salvatore. And I wanted to have another character that kind of almost plays a pseudo narrator. Narrator or just like kind of ties in all the stories and that's death. And so I, I was trying to figure out how do I depict death as a character without having feelings or emotions yet, somehow still having those things, even though he says he doesn't, 'cause obviously you could see from his narration and, and the way he speaks that he is concerned about certain things. And so that was the first thing I decided to create was that character.

And as you read the three novels, you'll see how he ties into everybody else's life, and he's kind of outside of Heaven, outside of Hell. He's not, you know, he's not on God's side, he's not on the devil's side. And so he is somewhere in the middle and, and I kind of needed a character like that because we're all kind of a little like that, you know? I mean, whether we believe or not, you know, we're not perfect. We have our own imperfections and we kind of lie in that place between heaven and hell. And so I thought it was nice having that.

As far as the boys go and Lyles who actually is the one that's probably the more of the main focus there it's I grew up in a New York city area. I went to School of Visual Arts, which is in Manhattan. You know, and so I just wanted to capture that New York life I wanted to capture the diversity. Also I didn't grow up with a lot of money. I grew up, you know, very meager means and things like that. And I wanted to capture that lifestyle too. I wanted to have the characters be very real and, and things that were going on during the time, the book, the first book takes place in the year 2000. And so it's a little bit different than New York city is right now. And I really wanted to capture Harlem during that time and a few other places too, and, and people from there and how things really were. And so that's where that goes.

Stan I just really wanted to, you know, I've always been fascinated by, you know, unsolved mysteries, serial killer stories, all these kind of things watched a lot of horror movies growing up. And so that was just me, you know, having fun with that, which is also where Radix comes from. Just my love for thrillers and horror films and just that serial killer kind of a villain, but yet with a supernatural twist.

Marccella07:33

So I have a, I have a question ands, like it's blowing my mind because this is reminiscent of another guest we had not too long ago. So are there any characters based on you?

Chris LoParco07:45

I feel like in a way, all the characters have a piece of me, yet they're not me at the same time, because the way that I write is I create characters first. And I learned that from a very, very good friend of mine, Lewis Mitchell, who taught me and a lot of my friends when we were, you know, both at School of Visual Arts and beyond that, all stories start with the characters. And so before I write any story, I create the characters first. And they all start with a little piece of me because I'm, I'm writing them, right?

But then they evolve and become their own people and then I actually start seeing what, what would that character do? You know, asking that question and you know, what would their reaction be? So centrally if you wanna look at it? Probably Nathan is the closest to me. As far as, you know, his description of how he looks, you know, He's five foot six, he's Italian American. He's from New York. He grew up in, you know, a small town right outside of the city, which I did. It's very reminiscent of myself, but there is a little bit of me, I hate to say this, inside of Radix. And there's a little bit of me inside of Death as well. So, you know,

Instagram Podcast Plug
Maccabee09:07

And, and, you know, that's the best thing about when you're writing and Marcella, and I definitely know this 'cause we're starting our own little projects as well. And we talked about yesterday on the Instagram LIVE that we did. So if you do, if you wanna hear more about that, go on our Instagram @BeyondthePenPodcast and we've got that LIVE up and it's definitely an interesting one.

But

Death and the Four Stages of Grief

I really, I wanted to start with Death really quick because there was a lot of things that were interesting on how you wrote Death, and here's why. When we first meet Death, he describes him his life, or the lack thereof, and how it feels like we're going through at least the first four stages of grief. First, he denies he's denied a life of his own, which makes him feel depressed and alone. He's angry with being refused to get help from God, and Satan, but mostly that he's, this one soul is refusing to die, you know? And then of course the entire thing with, like I said, with God, Satan, and the Angels, fallen and not, to get help. And finally, he's willing to bargain in some way, shape or form to remove this villain. Radix from the mortal world. How close was or have you had any of these conversations in the book to your talks with God?

Chris LoParco10:39

Oh, wow. That is quite the deep question. So yeah, so growing up, I definitely have had very similar conversations with the Lord and, and it's because I went through a lot of things in my life. And even, even not just when I was younger, but even more recently with a lot of personal things you know, I, I don't, I don't usually get too deep on what's going on in my life, but I'm obviously a single father. I went through a lot of things that got me to where I am with my children and in our current situation.

And I have questioned God many times in my life. Like why, why is all this happening to me? Why am I going through this? You know, I try to be faithful. I read scripture every day. I pray all the time. I help people as often as I can, but we all go through things and, you know, and we don't understand why.

And honestly, God does not mind us questioning those things. He, he actually asks us to bring those things before is thrown and to ask him questions like that. And he answers us and, you know, I, I I've read through scripture and I just see that, you know, all those things. Make us stronger, all those things that we go through and, and death is learning that, you know, it's, it's, it's kind of interesting what the character of Death is you would think he's been around for so long that he would have this figured out by now. But I wanna show people that no matter how long your journey is. You really don't ever have it a hundred percent figured out. You're always going to learn something new or still question things, no matter how far you are.

So thousands of years have gone by, and he's been dealing with the same situations yet in the year 2000, which, you know, he's still asking God why, and he's still at this point, going to the, you know, to the devil when Radix has been killing people since first century A.D. And so it's just to show people that in our own lives, we're like that, you know, we don't have things figured out and we probably never will. And so I wanted to just put that out there.

Dealing with Invisibility?
Maccabee12:44

And I'm really glad that you said that because I'm gonna tell you right now, the, the first time that he has a conversation with God, I loved it. I was like, there are so many ways that I was gonna say that too. And I've probably said that but here's the other thing with that and following up with that is that. There are so many points within any of the conversations that he's had. And any of the dealings of finding himself, dealing with depression, dealing with anxiety, dealing with anger. The fact that I remember one of the lines and don't quote me on this, but it was the fact that I remember when he was at, at the beginning where he was always wanting somebody to actually just see him for at least one second.

Chris LoParco13:30

Yeah.

To receive a full copy of this transcript, reach out to us through our contact form with the episode number and a $5 donation on CashApp to @BeyondthePenPodcast.

Chris LaParco Profile Photo

Chris LaParco

Author

Chris LoParco is a writer and an artist who draws his inspiration from his love for God and his deep interest in the epic battle between Light and Darkness. He is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts, and he is a very proud father.